A muchos les encanta comparanos con otros paises. Pues bien, veamos algunas regulaciones de redes inalámbricas en esos otros y comparémonos.

********************************************************************************************

https://www.adslzone.net/2017/01/12/wifi-podria-mas-potente-espana-esta-limitado/

Los siguientes textos van en inglés. Justo se me acabó el tiempo base de Nauta_Hogar ahora, así que no los paso por el traductor de Google.

********************************************************************************************

WLAN: Maximum Transmission Power (ETSI)

Different radio bands require different regulatory power limits. Each device you can buy, must not exceed any power limits given by the regulatory domain you want to deploy it in. The values given here are taken from the ETSI standards and apply to european countries. Some of the terms related to regulatory demands or transmission power used in this post are explained in this post.

2.4 GHz

There exists two EIRP power limits for the 2.4 GHz band, one for 802.11b rates with CCK modulation (1, 2, 5.5 and 11 Mbps) and one for 802.11g/n rates with OFDM modulation. The limit is set to 20 dBm (100 mW) for OFDM and 18 dBm (63 mW) for CCK.

The spectral power limitation of 10 dBm/MHz (10 mW/MHz) causes the lower power limit for 802.11b. As the spectral mask of the CCK modulation looks more like a sombrero, we see a high spectral power per MHz at the center and a lower one at the edges. So if you don’t lower the Tx power generally to 18 dBm, you exceed the spectral power limitation at the center of a 802.11b 20 MHz channel. For OFDM, the spectral mask looks more like a rectangular, so the power is nearly distributed equally, with an idealistic 7 dBm/MHz (5 mW/MHz) over a 20 MHz channel for example, and the maximum power limit of 20 dBm can be used.

5 GHz

Since the 5 GHz band is divided into two different ETSI Radio Local Area Network (RLAN) bands of 5150 to 5350 MHz and 5470 to 5725 MHz, which can be compared to the FCC Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure (U-NII) bands in the US, each band can have different power limits. As 802.11 only uses OFDM modulation in this radio band, there are no modulation specific regulations, only frequency specific.

RLAN band 1 (5150 to 5350 MHz)

Indoor only sub-band I (5150 – 5250 MHz)

The first RLAN sub-band includes the channels 36 to 48 and has an EIRP power limit to 23 dBm (200 mW). These channels are considered for indoor only usage and do not require any Dynamic Frquency Selection (DFS) or Transmit Power Control (TPC) features. It is comparable to FCC U-NII-1.

Indoor only sub-band II (5250 – 5350 MHz)

In the second sub-band of the RLAN band 1 with channels 52 to 64, the ETSI has set the EIRP power limit to 23 dBm (200 mW) for devices with TPC and 20 dBm (100 mW) for devices without TPC. For a device with TPC, the mean EIRP at the lowest power level of the TPC range must not exceed 17 dBm (50 mW). This band requires DFS support and is comparable to FCC U-NII-2.

RLAN band 2 (5470 to 5725 MHz)

Channels from 100 to 140 are part of the second RLAN band and have an EIRP power limit of 30 dBm (1000 mW) for TPC and 27 dBm (500 mW) for non-TPC devices or 20 dBm (100 mW) for devices without any TPC or DFS support. The mean EIRP power level for a slave device with TPC must not exceed 24 dBm at the the lowest TPC power level if the device is also capable of radar detection or 17 dBm otherwise. This band can be used for indoor and outdoor deployments as well and is comparable to FCC U-NII-2e.

RLAN band 3 / Broadband Radio Access Networks (BRAN) (5725 – 5875 MHz)

Comparable to the FCC U-NII-3 (5725 – 5825 MHz) band with a higher upper frequency range, the ETSI has defined the channels 155 to 171 (155, 159, 163, 167, 172) for Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) use. The idea is to give internet access to locations without any wired access network available. The maximum EIRP output power has been set to 36 dBm (4000 mW) with the limitation of RF power into antenna of 30 dBm (1000 mW).

Furthermore, with the ERC Recommendation 70-03, it is allowed to deploy WLAN in this band with a maximum EIRP output power of 14 dB (25 mW) in this frequency band.

Clarification: The RF output power is defined as the mean equivalent isotropic radiated power (e.i.r.p.) of the equipment during a transmission burst. In general, the limits are valid for the device with antenna gain and cable loss and not only the output power of WLAN module.

ETSI documents used for this post:
EN 300 328 v1.8.1 for 2.4 GHz
EN 301 893 v1.7.1 and EN 302 502 v1.2.1 for 5 GHz
Document 32005D0513 Article 4 on Indoor only usage of RLAN band 1.
ERC Recommendation 70-03 for short range devices in U-NII-3

Advice: The author hopes that the values given here are correct. If you can prove otherwise, feel free to comment or contact me directly.

*Update (2014-11-27): Use the term EIRP power instead of Tx power, I also added a clarification.*
*Update (2014-12-02): Substituted U-NII band definitions with ETSI RLAN bands.*
*Update (2014-12-09): Added link to post with term definitions, better definition of “lowest” power level with TPC*
*Update (2016-01-07): Correct indoor only use for frequency range 5250 – 5350 MHz, thanks to comment by Stefan Schneider.
*Update (2018-09-21): Added paragraph regarding usage of the U-NII-3 band with 25 mW EIRP.

 

********************************************************************************************

 

Note that the a and b bands means the 802.11/a (5GHz) and 802.11/b (2.4GHz) respectively. While these are not specifically named, this includes 802.11ac, 802.11n, 802.11g and the collections such as 802.11abgn.

Since the ETSI standard many of these have been replaced by a single standard. Here’s a very informative blogpost about the ETSI standard. The ETSI standard is used in the following regions:
Europe
Middle East
Africa
China
Indonesia
Singapore
Thailand
Vietnam
Parts of the Russian Federation

Short overview of the ETSI standard:
– 2.4 GHz: 100 mW (20 dBm)
– 5 GHz channel 36 to 64: 200 mW (23 dBm)
– 5 GHz channel 100 to 140: 1000 mW (30 dBm)
– 5 GHz channel 155 to 171: 4000 mW (36 dBm)

Country 802.11 Bands Channels Max txpower
AT a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Austria b 1-13 100
AU a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
200
1000
Australia b 1-11 200
BE a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Belgium b 1-13 100
BR a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
Brazil b 1-11 1000
CA a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Canada b 1-11 1000
CH a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Switzerland b 1-13 100
CN a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
China b 1-13 100
CY a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Cyprus b 1-13 100
CZ a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Czech Republic b 1-13 100
DE a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Germany b 1-13 100
DK a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Denmark b 1-13 100
EE a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Estonia b 1-11 1000
ES a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Spain b 1-13 100
FI a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Finland b 1-13 100
FR a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
France b 1-13 100
GB a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
United Kingdom b 1-13 100
GR a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Greece b 1-13 100
HK a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
200
4000
Hong Kong b 1-11 100
HU a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Hungary b 1-13 100
ID a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Indonesia b 1-13 100
IE a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Ireland b 1-13 100
IL a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
200
200
Israel b 1-13 100
IN a N/A N/A
India b 4000
IS a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
104, 108, 112, 116, 120, 124, 128, 132, 140
200
200
1000
Iceland b 1-11 100
IT a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Italy b 1-13 100
JP a 1-3
34, 38, 42, 46
200
200
Japan b 1-14 200
KE a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64 100,104,108,112 116, 120, 124 149, 153, 157, 161
600
Kenia b 1-13 600
KR a 149, 153, 157, 161 600
South Korea b 1-13 600
LT a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Lithuania b 1-11 1000
LU a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Luxembourg b 1-13 100
LV a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Latvia b 1-11 1000
MY a N/A 1000
Malaysia b 1-13 500
NL a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Netherlands b 1-13 100
NO a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Norway b 1-13 100
NZ a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
New Zealand b 1-11 1000
PH a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Philippines b 1-11 1000
PL a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Poland b 1-13 100
PT a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Portugal b 1-13 100
RU a N/A N/A
Russia b 1-13 63
SE a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Sweden b 1-13 100
SG a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Singapore b 1-13 100
SI a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Slovenia b 1-11 1000
SK a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Slovak Republic b 1-11 1000
TH a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
Thailand b 1-13 100
TW a 56, 60, 64,
100-140
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
Taiwan b 1-13 1000
US a 36, 40, 44, 48
52, 56, 60, 64
149, 153, 157, 161
200
1000
4000
United States b 1-11 1000
ZA a 36-64
100-140
155, 159, 163, 167, 172
200
1000
4000
South Africa b 1-13 100

 

************************************************************

Generally, in many countries (including the US) the highest allowable power output is one watt (1000mW), specifically this is the maximum allowable total radiated power (TRP). I don’t know of any country that allows a higher TRP for regular wifi use, some don’t even allow that much. Most consumer wifi devices wont be transmitting more than 28mW (.028 watts) anyhow. But it’s all about how you use those watts. That one watt limit is assuming a spherical radeation pattern but usually your more interested in transmitting your power in in a plane around you or maybe in a certain direction. When you squeeze the power down and concentrate it you are permitted to have the same power concentration in any area equivalent to the the power output (and range) that a spherical (isotropic) transmitter would make if it was transmitting at 4 watts, this is called equivalent isotropically (spherically) radiated power (EIRP). On your 2.4 ghz router that’s about all you get to play with. So that’s 1 watt TRP and 4 watts EIRP.

But with a point to point system your allowed to take the same concept much farther. With a big antenna that squashes almost of your signal down to a beam about five degrees wide, inside that beam you can have power levels equivalent to an isotropic transmitter at 158 watts (EIRP) for 2.4 ghz. In 5ghz space you can legally get a beam that would be 200 watt (EIRP) transmitter. With that kinda setup you can connect tens or even hundreds of miles away. There is no legal limit to how much you can squeeze the signal but your antennas will start getting gigantic after a certain point and your beam will get so small that little vibrations or wind will steer it off target.

But that’s nothing, what would you think if I told you that in the US you can legally transmit wifi at 1500 watts (PEP, peak envelope power, a similar unit to TRP), and then you can do this high gain antenna trick without limits to get an EIRP at absolutely ludicrous levels, legitimately connection ranges on the order of interplanetary distances. You just have to pass a $15 amateur radio license test first.

Channels 132 through 173 in the 5ghz band and channels 1 through 6 in the 2.4ghz band can be used with ham rules along with some additional channels that are usually locked out in the firmware. (No this is not illegal if you are transmitting under amateur radio rules.)

But it may not be as useful as you hope. Under amateur radio rules you are not allowed to use any form of encryption or obfuscation which includes things like wep and https; everything including passwords must be sent in the clear. Your not allowed to use it for business so no work emails. You are prohibited from sending or receiving anything that is indecent or obscene. The transmission of music is not permitted.

You would be allowed to order things for personal use, the proverbial call to the pizza restaurant is permitted, but you would have to figure out how to do this wile sending everything in the clear (including login passwords and credit card numbers).

Oh and while your allowed to tx up to 1500 watts, you are still supposed to use the lowest amount of transmit power required to complete the communication. That may be even less than the one watt allowed for unlicensed users.

Because of all this it would be really hard to hook your ham wifi up to the regular internet and actually use it to browse the web without breaking the rules.

*********************************************************************************************************

Regulación europea para homologación de equipamiento

European-Union-5th-RTTE-Market-Surveillance-Campaign-Report.pdf

 

 


10 commentarios

AleWiccan · 5 junio, 2019 a las 10:42 am

Los últimos párrafos traducidos:
En general, en muchos países (incluido los EE. UU.), La potencia de salida más alta permitida es de un vatio (1000 mW), específicamente, esta es la potencia radiada total máxima permitida (TRP). No conozco ningún país que permita un TRP más alto para el uso regular de wifi, algunos ni siquiera lo permiten. La mayoría de los dispositivos wifi de consumo no transmitirán más de 28 mW (.028 vatios) de todos modos. Pero se trata de cómo usas esos vatios. Ese límite de un vatio está asumiendo un patrón de radiación esférico, pero generalmente está más interesado en transmitir su poder en un plano a su alrededor o tal vez en una cierta dirección. Cuando presiona la potencia y la concentra, se le permite tener la misma concentración de potencia en cualquier área equivalente a la potencia de salida (y rango) que un transmisor esférico (isotrópico) haría si estuviera transmitiendo a 4 vatios, esto es denominado equivalente de potencia radiada isotrópica (esférica) (EIRP). En tu enrutador de 2.4 ghz, eso es todo con lo que puedes jugar. Entonces eso es 1 vatio TRP y 4 vatios EIRP.

Pero con un sistema punto a punto, puedes llevar el mismo concepto mucho más lejos. Con una gran antena que aplasta casi su señal hasta un haz de unos cinco grados de ancho, dentro de ese haz puede tener niveles de potencia equivalentes a un transmisor isotrópico de 158 vatios (EIRP) para 2.4 ghz. En el espacio de 5 GHz, puede obtener legalmente un haz que sería un transmisor de 200 vatios (EIRP). Con ese tipo de configuración puedes conectar decenas o incluso cientos de millas de distancia. No existe un límite legal sobre cuánto puede comprimir la señal, pero sus antenas comenzarán a volverse gigantescas después de cierto punto y su haz se volverá tan pequeño que las pequeñas vibraciones o el viento lo desviarán del objetivo.

Pero eso no es nada, ¿qué pensaría si le dijera que en los EE. UU. Puede transmitir wifi de forma legal a 1500 vatios (PEP, potencia de envolvente máxima, una unidad similar a TRP), y luego puede hacer este truco de antena de alta ganancia sin límites? Para obtener un EIRP en niveles absolutamente ridículos, los rangos de conexión legítimamente en el orden de las distancias interplanetarias. Solo tienes que pasar una prueba de licencia de radio amateur de $ 15 primero.
Los canales 132 a 173 en la banda de 5 Ghz y los canales 1 a 6 en la banda de 2.4 Ghz se pueden usar con reglas de jamón junto con algunos canales adicionales que generalmente están bloqueados en el firmware. (No, esto no es ilegal si está transmitiendo bajo las reglas de radio de aficionados).

Pero puede que no sea tan útil como esperas. Bajo las reglas de radioaficionados, no está permitido usar ninguna forma de cifrado u ofuscación que incluya cosas como wep y https; Todo lo que incluye contraseñas debe ser enviado en claro. No está permitido usarlo para negocios, por lo que no hay correos electrónicos de trabajo. Está prohibido enviar o recibir cualquier cosa que sea indecente u obscena. La transmisión de música no está permitida.

Se le permitiría ordenar cosas para uso personal, se permite la llamada proverbial al restaurante de pizzas, pero tendría que averiguar cómo hacer esto enviando todo de forma clara (incluidas las contraseñas de inicio de sesión y los números de tarjetas de crédito).

Ah, y mientras se le permite utilizar hasta 1500 vatios, se supone que debe utilizar la menor cantidad de potencia de transmisión necesaria para completar la comunicación. Eso puede ser incluso menor que el vatio permitido para usuarios sin licencia.

Debido a todo esto, sería muy difícil conectar su wifi de ham a la Internet normal y utilizarla para navegar por la web sin romper las reglas.

    Maikel · 5 junio, 2019 a las 11:22 am

    -el problema de limitar tanto la EIRP, en lugar de la TRP. esto parece impedir hasta el uso de mejores antenas, emplear menos potencia de salida del equipo, pero mejorada la señal con antenas bien direccionales y buena gananacia
    -como ves, incluso en eeuu para llegar y pasar del limite necesitas licencia y certificacion de radioaficionado
    -pero si caes en ese rango de potencia y condiciones, no se puede usar seguridad ninguna en los datos, es regla internacional, creo de radioaficionados
    -aun pueda meter 1W, es REqUERIDO usar SOLO la potencia NECESARIA para ASEGURAR la comunicacion

baba yaga · 4 junio, 2019 a las 3:42 pm

ojo q quiere decir en el artículo 37 resol. 98 cuando dice, Los equipos que operen en las frecuencias entre 2456 y 2483.5 MHz pueden
emplear valores de p.i.r.e superiores, cuando ello se justifique en beneficio de
objetivos de interés nacional,
Cuándo eres un objetivo de interes nacional?, podria la SNET convertirse en algo parecido a interés nacional?, quien te clasifica como Interés Nacional.?

alex daniel · 4 junio, 2019 a las 1:10 pm

Tengo una duda para sacar la licencia donde hay que ir

jorje holguin · 3 junio, 2019 a las 3:53 pm

La realidad es que en nuestro país solo tenemos a etecsa y sus servicios aparte de bastantes malos bien caros .como no vamos a hacer comparación. En la gran mayoría de los países las redes WiFi se usan en lugares públicos y por lo general gratuita, además la internet a un precio razonable y 3g y 4g a ful.

Ades · 1 junio, 2019 a las 9:21 am

Si, pero cuando hay una antena WiFi a 400m de tu casa y con un precio bajo, no se necesita crear redes comunitarias ni emitir a mas de 100mw, en eso no somos iguales a los otros países, así que las comparaciones son buenas, pero hay que aterrizarlas

leo Esteves · 31 mayo, 2019 a las 5:22 pm

Por lo q veo las redes de juego van al piso

Leo Estevez · 31 mayo, 2019 a las 5:20 pm

Por lo q veo las redes de juego van al piso

MATR1X · 31 mayo, 2019 a las 3:41 pm

Demadre…en inglés, información desperdiciada

AleWiccan · 31 mayo, 2019 a las 3:27 pm

Muy interesante, aparentemente entre mas grande es el pais mas potencia pueden usar…

Deja un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *